History and Scope



We all live on a planetary surface shaped by terrestrial geoprocesses. This topic has been much in the news lately due to the increase in extreme meteorological events, attributed by some to global climate change. But crustal volcanism and active tectonics also influence terrestrial geoprocesses. These crustal processes make the news only when a large earthquake or eruption occurs, but the events soon drop from the news and people forget about them. However, their secondary effects on terrestrial geoprocesses continue. Our proposed IFG "Terrestrial Processes Perturbed by Tectonics" (TPPT) will support studies of the longer-term effects of tectonic events on geomorphic systems, and contrast them with effects of non-seismic forcing such as extreme meteorological events and slower climate change.


Studies of this type are best described as 'tectonic geomorphology', but most past tectonic geomorphology studies have been descriptive rather than process-oriented. From a process perspective, an earthquake induces a rapid perturbation to a steady-state geomorphic system, which then triggers a system response. The response can be characterized spatially (severity over a geographic extent) or temporally. The response also, via erosion/deposition, creates an archive in the Holocene geologic record, just as climate changes have done. Specifically, we propose to address two broad questions: (1) how a geomorphic system's long-term response to earthquakes differs from its response to (say) extreme meteorological events, or from slower climate change, and (2) whether the indicators of secondary tectonic effects in the geologic record have unique characteristics, that would allow them the be distinguished from non-tectonic causes. This effort builds on past TERPRO work on the immediate secondary effects of large earthquakes (e.g. the ESI Scale), but extends it back into the late Quaternary. Comparing tectonic 'archive' data to its climate archive counterparts will involve participation from the broad disciplinary range within TERPRO.



Key Science Questions That the IFG TPPT Seeks to Address


  1. After large historic earthquakes, how extensive were the primary and secondary changes in local/regional geomorphic systems? (refer to the ESI Scale and related databases)
  2. How long did the changes last? In other words, how long did it take the system to return to its pre-earthquake state?
  3. Do earthquakes of a given magnitude produce the same severity and affected area of secondary effects, or does it vary among regions/environments?
  4. If the secondary effects vary, what factors make them vary?
  5. Are geomorphic systems in some regions/environments intrinsically more sensitive to earthquake perturbations
  6. If so, are these same regions also more sensitive to other types of perturbations, ranging from single extreme events, to slower regional climate change?
  7. When a perturbed system responds to move back toward equilibrium, does it take the same response path regardless of the magnitude of the triggering event? Or is its response magnitude-dependent? In other words, are there critical thresholds for the trigger magnitude
  8. For responding systems, is the response path identical for different types of triggers of a given intensity (earthquakes, extreme flood events, climate change)? If not, why?







TERPRO President


Jim McCalpin
GEO-HAZ Consulting, Inc., USA
mccalpin@geohaz.com




Leader of the Group

Stéphane Baize
IRSN, France
stephane.baize@irsn.fr



Group Co-Leaders

Xuanmei Fan
University of Twente, Netherlands
fanxuanmei@gmail.com


Gabriel Gonzalez
Departamento de Ciencias Geologicas, Universidad Catlica del Norte, Avenida Angamos 0610 Antofagasta, Chile
ggonzale@ucn.cl


Gabriel Vargas-Easton
Univ. of Chile, CHILE
gvargas@ing.uchile.cl




List of All Members

Table showing the number of the PATA Participants per country (e.g. attended at least one of the PATA days workshops since 2009).


No. of participants
In %
Country Code
Country
1 88 14.08 ITA Italia
2 75 12.00 GRE Greece
3 46 7.36 GER Germany
4 39 6.24 ESP Spain
5 38 6.08 USA USA
6 32 5.12 NZL New Zealand
7 30 4.80 KOR South Korea
8 26 4.16 GBR Great Britain
9 24 3.84 MEX Mexico
10 17 2.72 JPN Japan
11 16 2.56 FRA France
12 16 2.56 IDO Indonesia
13 13 2.08 ISR Israel
14 12 1.92 CHI Chile
15 11 1.76 BEL Belgium
16 11 1.76 IND India
17 10 1.60 BUL Bulgaria
18 10 1.60 CZE Czech Republic
19 10 1.60 POL Poland
20 7 1.12 AUS Australia
21 6 0.96 IRI Republica of Ireland
22 6 0.96 POR Portugal
23 5 0.80 AUT Austria
24 5 0.80 ECU Ecuador
25 5 0.80 RUS Russia
26 5 0.80 TUR Turkey
27 5 0.80 VEN Venezuela
28 4 0.64 ARG Argentina
29 4 0.64 CHN China
30 4 0.64 PHI Phillipines
31 4 0.64 SLO Slovenia
32 3 0.48 CAN Canada
33 3 0.48 LTU Lithuania
34 3 0.48 SIN Singapure
35 2 0.48 SWE Sweden
36 2 0.32 ALG Algeria
37 2 0.32 FIN Finnland
38 2 0.32 KYG Kyrgystan
39 2 0.32 MOR Moroccan
40 2 0.32 SUI Switzerland
41 2 0.32 THA Thailand
42 1 0.16 AND Andorra
43 1 0.16 COL Colombia
44 1 0.16 CRC Costa Rica
45 1 0.16 CRO Croatia
46 1 0.16 CYP Cyprus
47 1 0.16 DAN Denmark
48 1 0.16 EGY Egypt
49 1 0.16 ETH Ethiopia
50 1 0.16 HUN Hungary
51 1 0.16 NED Nederland's
52 1 0.16 NOR Norway
53 1 0.16 OMN Oman
54 1 0.16 PAK Pakistan
55 1 0.16 PER Peru
56 1 0.16 ROM Romania
57 1 0.16 TPE Taiwan Province of China
58 1 0.16 VIE Vietnam


All our members are listed here